Implementing Wild Animals Emerge from Layers of Cardboard in Scott Fife’s Sculptures — Colossal

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#animals
#cardboard
#Scott Fife
#sculpture

November 23, 2022

Grace Ebert

A photo of a cardboard bear bust

“Polar Undergo” (2011), archival cardboard, ink, and pink pencil, 26 x 53 x 29 inches. Picture via Mark Davidson. All photographs shared with permission

Armed with glue and screws, artist Scott Fife models large-scale creatures from a humble subject matter in an exploration of the connection between people and our animal opposite numbers, in particular the ones we go together with delusion and folklore. The beastly creations emerge in his aptly named solo display Cardboard Kingdom, which is on view now at Traver Gallery in Seattle.

Made from fringed layers and patchwork, the animals are wild and expressive, with drowsy, drooping eyes or snarling tooth. Many endure the markings of human contact, with drips of ink and pencil drawings on their faces and our bodies. “Bodily gorgeous, we endear those animals with many meanings. However they’re predators and prey in a brutal international. Those are portraits of people as they’re in nature,” he stocks.

Cardboard Kingdom is on view via December 22, and you’ll to find extra of Fife’s sculptures on his website.

 

A photo of a cardboard lion bust

“Lioness” (2011), archival cardboard, ink, and pink pencil, 26 x 53 x 29 inches. Picture via Mark Davison

A photo of a cardboard dog

Element of “Canine With Picasso Guitar” (2022), archival cardboard, glue, drywall screws, and ink, 14 x 60 x 30 inches. Picture via Traver Gallery

A photo of a cardboard dog

“Canine With Picasso Guitar” (2022), archival cardboard, glue, drywall screws, and ink, 14 x 60 x 30 inches. Picture via Traver Gallery

A photo of a cardboard wolf bust

“Had been Wulf” (2007), archival cardboard, ink, and pink pencil, 25 x 25 x 34 inches. Picture via Traver Gallery

A photo of a cardboard horse bust

“Horse” (2012), archival cardboard, dry screws, glue, ink, and pencil markings, 46 x 64 x 15 inches. Picture via Traver Gallery

A photo of a cardboard wolf bust

Element of “Had been Wulf” (2007), archival cardboard, ink, and pink pencil, 25 x 25 x 34 inches. Picture via Traver Gallery

Scott Fife's sculptures in a gallery

Picture via Traver Gallery

#animals
#cardboard
#Scott Fife
#sculpture

 

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